5 Lower Back Pain Myths

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Lower back pain is one of the most common ailments that patients are treated for. Unfortunately, since this pain is so prevalent there have come to be a lot of misconceptions about it. Here are 5 myths about lower back pain to help you discover if how you are tackling your pain is beneficial to your body.

  1. If my back hurts, I should lie down and rest. Often when people experience back pain, their initial reaction is to sit or lie down to rest. They fear that movement of the painful body part will only make it worse. In most conditions, the opposite of this is true. It is important to remain mobile and active to help reduce joint stiffness and muscle wasting due to disuse.
  2. Adolescents or young adults who experience low back pain do not have to worry about chronic back problems. Chronic low back pain is one of the highest costs to our medical system today. Poor exercise and lifting habits start early and contribute to movement dysfunction throughout our lives. If low back pain is initiated at a young age, the likelihood of developing a chronic issue into adulthood is very high. Treatment and training for proper body mechanics is important at this stage and should be discussed early on in the course of pain.
  3. Passive modalities and exercise are a physical therapist’s only treatment options. At PT Solutions, we utilize the most current literature to deliver the most beneficial care for our patients. For low back pain, this means a hands-on approach to deliver manual based techniques that will restore mobility of the joints and soft tissues of the spine.
  4. Everyone has it, so I should just ignore it until it gets really bad. Our bodies respond to pain by shutting down muscle firing, thus creating more movement dysfunction. Muscle fibers that are not being used atrophy, or die, making it harder to rehabilitate and return to normal. This typically results in increased length of care and utilization of more invasive (and thus, more expensive) methods of treatment. It has been shown that those who seek physical therapy treatment during the very early stages of low back pain will have earlier reduction of symptoms and longer lasting effects of treatment.
  5. Low back pain manifests as isolated, focal pain in the central lower spine. Dysfunction at the lumbar spine can result in pain that extends the full length of the leg. The bony anatomy of the spine houses the spinal cord and neural tissues that connect to the entire lower extremity. Therefore, when we have movement dysfunction or inflammation at the joints of the spine, these neural tissues can become compromised and can be affected anywhere along their course. We often see pain originating from the low back manifest as hip, buttock, thigh, knee, calf, or ankle pain. At PT Solutions, we take a full body approach to discover the origin of dysfunction rather than just treating the symptoms.

If you have lower back pain that just isn’t going away. Request a complimentary injury screening to see if physical therapy is right for you.